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Weekly Update – Naked Paper at Tower Gallery

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July 25, 2007   ·   5 Comments

This week’s Weekly has my review of Naked Paper at Tower Gallery. Below is the copy with some pictures. More photos at flickr.

Border Patrol
Frames are so last century.

Until recently, buying a print or drawing meant also buying a frame that might cost as much as or more than the artwork. Today, thanks to a confluence of technology, taste and economics, frames are out.

Randall Sellers
Randall Sellers, Exeunt Omnes, 2007. graphite and conte on paper 8 1/2 x 11, a work at Tower Gallery’s Naked paper show.

Nowadays galleries, museums and collectors­—seeking the authentic experience of living with art up close and personal—are pinning works to walls or taping them up with acid-free archival tape. To hell with conserving the art for future generations—let’s enjoy the drawing now. And let’s enjoy it the way the artists do in their studios: no glass, just raw on the wall.

Christopher Davison
Christopher Davison, Untitled, 2007. ink gouache, crayon, micron, acrylic on rives lightweight

“Naked Paper” at Tower Gallery is a great immersion into the tape-and-pin phenomenon. The naked look shocks at first. The works look vulnerable, their edges limp. And an entire gallery full of unframed works feels a little unfinished. But walking among the show’s 47 works by 22 mostly Philadelphian artists, you understand why creators love this approach.

Whether the work is cartoony or abstract—made of cut paper or created with pencil, ink or paint—unframed works are deliciously intimate, and their surfaces are tactile and seductive. It’s art untamed and wild.

The show is full of outstanding works by young artists, many of whom are recent graduates of local M.F.A. programs.

Hunter Stabler
Hunter Stabler, The Theosopher’s Stone. detail. 2007. hand cut paper 26 x 26″

Hunter Stabler’s cut-paper icons (rams’ heads, a star in a circle, a snake eating its tail) are marvels of technique and a little scary for being so perfect. Christopher Davison’s ink and gouache drawings are positively Boschian. In one, a jaunty striped egg with legs and arms holds a severed head. Davison has also made a book packed with such imagery, an accumulation of fierce Technicolor dreams about trolls and giants.

Caroline Santa
Caroline Santa, Together, We can make it happen! 2007. gouache and acrylic on paper. 5 x 8′

Caroline Santa’s large gouache and acrylic on paper adds humor to the tale of a relationship (two fighters in a ring with a surveillance control booth nearby). Randall Sellers’ delicate pencil drawing of a young woman’s face almost melts away before your eyes. Keary Rosen’s repeat line drawings are blurry-eyed and Etch A Sketch perfect. Jina Valentine’s distressed black-and-white photos on abaca paper evoke KKK cross burnings. Kip Deeds’ 50-foot scroll—much of it on the floor—proves paper’s power off the wall, as do Tasja Keetman’s 14 hanging panels (with lights embedded) that create a wall of ghosts running down the middle of the room.

Keary Rosen
Keary Rosen, Larry and the Riller at Johnnie Brook Rd. 2007. graphite. 17 x 14″

With great shows like this, the fledgling Tower Gallery is off to a terrific start.

“Naked Paper”
Through Aug. 24. Tower Gallery, 969 Second St. 215.253.9874.

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5 Responses to “Weekly Update – Naked Paper at Tower Gallery”

  1. Andrea Kirsh says:

    Roberta, For works on paper hung without frames or mats, remember the clever method that Charles Livingston used for his very large works? Magnets. I’ve seen sets sold as magnetic buletin boards (at Fosters on 3rd St.and elsewhere) where the magnetic part that mounts on the wall is a long strip, and what shows on the front are small, round magnets. And no holes in the paper!

  2. roberta says:

    Yes, I do remember and I’ve seen them too in galleries, maybe Gallery Joe. They’re a wonderful addition to the tape and pin brigade. thanks for the reminder, Andrea!

  3. Anonymous says:

    During the month of July my handmade paper art hung frame free on the walls at 3rd Street gallery. I agree that it allows the viewer an up close and personal experience. It also allows the eye to flow (unrestricted) from one piece to the next. Rhea Dennis

  4. roberta says:

    Hi Rhea, sorry I missed your show. Your comment about the eye flowing from one piece to the next unimpeded by frames is a great comment. Frames are indeed speed bumps in the visual highway.

  5. […] (Images via giantrobot, robotnine, theartblog) […]

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