Quantcast

artblog international » news » reviews, features & interviews

Letter From Paris: Keith Haring’s Political Line

By

April 24, 2013   ·   6 Comments

HARING RELIGION

—Sometimes lost in discussion of Keith Haring is his work’s political edge.  Matthew tells us all about it in his review of the Paris exhibit of the artist’s works.–the artblog editors————————–>It’s hard to believe that the ever-youthful icon of the 1980s New York Artworld has already been gone 23 years. Keith Haring, the most famous subway scribbler the world has ever known, took chalk and markers and finally paint and canvas, and spread his scribbles across pretty much everything in his path.  An expansive exhibition of his more political works – touching upon the state, media, capitalism, racism, nuclear and ecological suicide and finally AIDs – fills the Musée de la Ville de Paris to the brim, in an oddly joyful display of more than 100 large canvases, sculptures and collages.

HARING RELIGION

Religion and television : An art of excess and violence. Untitled, 25 September 1985. Acrylic on canvas.  Collection: Glenstone.

Haring defined not only a certain spirit of New York in the 1980s, but also a very particular kind of mark:  The line.

The Kutztown, PA native (1958-1990) drew in a simple cartoon fashion, creating a vocabulary almost overnight of his idiosyncratic hieroglyphics of crawling babies, barking dogs, “Everyman” figures (some with holes in them others brandishing crosses or getting zapped by spaceships), talking TVs, atomic bombs (with crawling babies) and a cavalry of monsters, penises, and angels. Immediately recognizable, Haring capitalized on the public’s consumption of his work by making politics, social muckraking and art his priority.

A Pile of Crowns for Haring's relationship with Jean-Michel Basquiat was iconic, ironic and touching. Image: Jean-Michel Basquiat, 1988. Acrylic on canvas. Collection: Keith Haring Foundation.

Haring’s relationship with Jean-Michel Basquiat was iconic, ironic and touching.  Image: A Pile of Crowns for  Jean-Michel Basquiat, 1988. Acrylic on canvas. Collection: Keith Haring Foundation.

Haring had many styles, some more detailed than others.

In his Untitled, 25 September 1985, (top image) his palette is rich in color and echos pop artists Valerio Adami and Patrick Caulfield. This and other works like it raised the bar for street and graffiti artists with a sure hand and a fluid and graphic surrealism that takes on religion, television and the violence of excess.

Keith Haring's attack on apartheid in South Africa, Untitled 1984.  Acrylic on canvas. Collection Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam.

Keith Haring’s attack on apartheid in South Africa, Untitled 1984. Acrylic on canvas. Collection Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam.

The artist’s influence on others

His lines influenced almost every graffiti artist in the world, like Jean-Michel Basquiat, who drew crowns and mysterious texts in and around SoHo; Mark Kostabi who produced thousands of simple “everyman” line drawings during the same time period;  and even the designer, Stephen Sprouse.  Haring became a global brand, and indeed the artist traveled to Berlin before his death to add to the gallery of works painted on the Berlin Wall.  Many of the works in the Paris exhibition were produced with friend and fellow graffiti artist LAII. Others echo a fashion that took hold of New York and other capitals and never let go – converse sneakers, pop shops, political art pasted up on walls everywhere.  Vandalism?  Well, those early 1980 subway posters could now buy you a house in Kutztown – or Paris.

There are a half dozen of Haring's chalk subway drawings on view.  The white chalk on black paper drawings were almost everywhere in the New York Subways in the early 1980s.

There are a half dozen of Haring’s chalk subway drawings on view. The white chalk on black paper drawings were almost everywhere in the New York Subways in the early 1980s.

Keith Haring died of AIDs-related illnesses in February 1990, but he was perpetually concerned with death and acutely aware of the ravages a political and social oppression had on the world he lived in.

His take on drugs as well as the AIDs virus politicized through art a whole new way of political revolt.  Silence = Death, a 1990 documentary by Rosa von Praunheim about AIDs and activism, featured Keith Haring, David Wojnarowicz, Alan Ginsburg among other artists, brought the political and the aesthetic into sharp focus.

The artist goes after crack cocaine as he sought ever larger canvases for his message.  Here in the mid 1980s on the entrance ramp for the The Triborough Bridge.

The artist goes after crack cocaine as he sought ever-larger canvases for his message. Here in the mid-1980s on the entrance ramp for the Triborough Bridge.

 

What is key to the Haring legacy is public art – an art that was in the world, about repression of all stripes, and clear in its energetic poetry that the world could be changed with art, and with a single piece of chalk.

This is a wonderfully produced show and a pleasure to see the full breadth of Haring’s world – sculptures, objects (screens, an Egyptian sarcophagus, Coca-Cola signs and many drawn on vases and urns).  The exhibition reminds anyone who saw his work as he created it or years later as it has spread across the planet like wildflowers that art does have a purpose.  Haring’s work is particular in that it has a sincere and persistent joy.  That joy persists in Paris through the end of summer.  See it, it’s well worth the ride.

Untitled (for James Ensor), 5 May 1989. Acrylic on canvas.  Courtesy: Arario Gallery, South Korea.

Untitled (for James Ensor), 5 May 1989. Acrylic on canvas. Courtesy: Arario Gallery, South Korea.

 

Keith Haring: The Political Line, April 19 – August 18, 2013.  Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris. 11, avenue du Président Wilson, 75016 Paris.  Métro: Iena. For more information, hours and access: mam.paris.fr.  Keith Haring Foundation/Information website.

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

6 Responses to “Letter From Paris: Keith Haring’s Political Line”

  1. maxmulhern@hotmail.com says:

    It’s too bad that Haring is not here today to witness the legalization of gay marriage in so many western nations.
    The Ensor reference gives pith to Haring’s anxious lines.
    It is interesting to see this show in Robert Combas’ country and I wonder if we won’t see a show of his soon in reaction to Haring?

  2. MATTHEW ROSE says:

    Oddly enough I was forced to think about Combas because this exhibition took place in Paris. Robert Combas essentially lifted Haring’s signature scribbling in a way that has never appealed to me because the Frenchman doesn’t reinvent that line. I’ve always had the sick feeling Combas saw an opportunity to become the French Keith Haring. Feels like it. There are others who have channeled Jean-Michel Basquiat, and in some respects Cesar (I might get hammered for this) ripped off Warhol in his day-glo portraits. Nothing new, here. In the end My guess: Combas will stay quiet because he might not want to draw the comparison.

  3. Caterina Verde says:

    Maripol just made a film – a tribute to Keith Haring, “The Message” for Arte Creative.

    Here’s the link: http://creative.arte.tv/fr/node/12391

  4. James FISH says:

    Interesting. I plan on seeing the show. I like what you’ve written.
    I also want ot see some of his collages.

    Before his death, he came to my school and did a great large piece.
    There was a time when i thought his stuff was has-been, but its time for it again. seems fresh and politically present which is also refreshing.

    Much has been diluted or just deflated and overhyped.

    bravo. J

  5. Haring and Basquiat left life on Canal Street bejeweled in the ’70s and ’80s. I knew Haring by sight. SAMO, aka Basquiat, seemed to my eyes clearly better than every other NY graffiti artist — except Haring.

  6. RICK PROL says:

    A great review Matthew! I always felt his work was all about politics and fun. The right combination to get your message across like The Clash. Love his work. Only really knew him as an “acquantanc” (sp?) but he was always very nice and cool. I remember watching at the Mercer Street Shaffrazi space all alone – just me and him and he was painting on a huge tarp! Very fortunate to have seen him working like that. I was at Renee Ricard’s place and he had a big Haring in his bedroom. I know some people who tore off the black white chalk pieces in the subways! I have a little Haring he gave me with him signing it to me. I’ve kept it all these years. I also saw Keith at a Basquiat show at the Vrej Baghoomian Gallery. Jean Michel was already gone and Keith was showing the signs of AIDs with the sarcoma on his skin, and I remember he had a very sad countenance. It was sad. Tragic. I felt so bad for him. Gone was that very confident happy Keith I always would encounter. Shortly after, he was gone, too. R.I.P. Keith. He brought a lot of inspiration to the scene at that time. A great role model. I miss him.

Leave a Reply