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artblog goes to florida, california and new york too.

Woman

Vulgar Lives — Rosalyn Drexler at Garth Greenan Gallery

[Joshua examines an exhibition of Drexler’s work spanning the heyday of Pop Art to the late ’80s, when painting was no longer in vogue. — the artblog editors] At Garth Greenan Gallery, Rosalyn Drexler presents the absurd and ominous in a comic-like manner in her most recent exhibition, Vulgar Lives, bringing together work that spans several decades. Her works border on violent and vulgar, highlighting central themes such as violence against women, racism, and social alienation. Her use of bright colors and whimsy juxtaposes these serious topics in an amusing way–a practice common among Pop artists. Drexler brings together reality ... More » »

Jewelry

From Ancient to Modern at NYU’s Institute for the Study of the Ancient World

[Andrea leads us through the discovery of ancient Sumerian art and artifacts, and some of the modern works inspired by “Primitivism”. — the artblog editors] Unlike other exhibitions held in the two compact galleries of New York University’s elegantly-housed, uptown Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW), this one focuses on the past century. From Ancient to Modern: Archaeology and Aesthetics, on view through June 7, 2015, investigates the reception of Sumerian objects excavated at Ur by Leonard Wooley in the 1920s, and by Henri Frankfort in the Diyala River Valley in the early 1930s. The fascinating exhibition makes ... More » »

Print

From the Digital Toolbox at Rutgers-Camden Center for the Arts

[Here’s an in-depth look at a fascinating four-artist show delving into origins and variations of photography, memory, neural connections, and digital painting. This is the catalog essay of From the Digital Toolbox, curated by Andrea Kirsh. — the artblog editors] Now that cell phones and cameras allow everyone to generate digital images, it seems a good time to look at what artists are doing with digital technology. All four artists in From the Digital Toolbox trained as painters; yet each turned to digital tools, either adding them to studio equipment of brushes, paints, and drawing materials, or replacing traditional tools entirely. The artists were selected ... More » »

Art installation

The elephant in the gallery — Carl Andre at Dia:Beacon

[Natalia addresses a retrospective of work by Carl Andre. Lately, some viewers are able to overlook the awful death of Andre’s wife, Ana Mendieta; many others see his work as forever tainted. — the artblog editors] Heralded by Dia:Beacon as “the first museum survey of Andre’s entire oeuvre,” Carl Andre: Sculpture as Place, 1958­–2010 is a retrospective dedicated to the oft-proclaimed “founding father” of American Minimalism.Bathed in natural light, Carl Andre’s work appears clean, honest and orderly in Dia’s pristine exhibition spaces, true to the paradigmatic Minimalist aesthetic he was instrumental in establishing. What’s left unsaid Yet like most founding fathers, his past ... More » »

Painting

V.S. Gaitonde at the Guggenheim Museum, N.Y.

[Andrea explores the subtleties of V.S. Gaitonde, a non-objective artist whose work shows the influence of Indian culture, Paul Klee, and Buddhism. — the artblog editors]  The extraordinarily seductive, abstract paintings of V.S. Gaitonde are unlikely to be familiar to Guggenheim Museum visitors, unless they have a prior knowledge of modern art in India. This makes a visit to V.S. Gaitonde: Painting as Process, Painting as Life (on view through Feb. 11, 2015) imperative for anyone wishing to engage with modern, non-Western art of the 1960s–1990s. Beyond that, it offers an intensely rich vision of the possibilities of painting. The exhibition ... More » »

Boy

Contemporary Mexican photographers at Bronx Documentary Center

[Rachel visits a successful show of contemporary Mexican and Mexican-American photography, shot from the insider perspective. — the artblog editors] The border. The landscape. The people. The culture. The life. Mexico has long fascinated foreign photographers, with Paul Strand and Edward Weston being notable examples. This fascination continues today, with American photojournalists going to capture life on the other side of the border, or artists drawing inspiration from the country’s vibrant culture. While the resulting images are certainly valid (and often revelatory or beautiful), how they become interpreted and the imaginations they provoke perpetuate a long tradition of the outsider’s gaze ... More » »

Figures kissing

Dear Nemesis — Nicole Eisenman at the Institute of Contemporary Art

[Michael enjoys a retrospective of Nicole Eisenman’s incisive, poignant, and often-hilarious work. — the artblog editors] I visited Dear Nemesis knowing nothing about Brooklyn-based artist Nicole Eisenman, and seeing her work for the first time. The 20-year survey of her paintings, prints, sculpture, and drawings is physically and emotionally challenging to appreciate because of the sheer number of works displayed, the dramatic subject matter explored, and the extent to which so many of the works themselves are absorbing. Prolific and political The exhibit is comprised of 20 or so large canvases; a set of 34 prints (mixed-media and monotypes on paper); ... More » »

Egon Schiele, "Self-Portrait with Arm Twisted above Head," 1910.

Egon Schiele at Neue Galerie

[Diana analyzes two self-portraits in a new show by the short-lived, yet prolific painter Egon Schiele. — the artblog editors] While Egon Schiele is notorious for his depictions of erotica, subjects performing acrobatic sexual acts upon themselves and each other, his motives for creating them were as commercial as they were prurient (they sold!). His models were usually prostitutes, but even cheaper was the model he always had at hand: himself. Schiele based his multiple self-portraits on his image in the full-length mirror he kept in his studio and even took with him when he traveled. Iconic composition and narcissism The ... More » »

Art Basel Miami

Miami Project, on the periphery of Art Basel Miami

[Andrea singles out several favorites from Miami Project, one of ABMB’s satellite fairs. She found herself particularly drawn to drawings this year. — the artblog editors] Miami Project is a fairly new member of the 22 smaller fairs that circle, like small fish, around the shark that is Art Basel Miami Beach. The dealers are all well-established galleries across the U.S. As usual, I paid attention to the work that was unfamiliar, and found a lot of it interesting. Rare sketches from Mel Chin Mel Chin’s work was on view at Jonathan Ferrara Gallery (New Orleans): a wall piece in ... More » »

Print

Renderings, a group show at the University of Delaware

[Marvin reviews a show of printmaking and collage work that both achieves a breadth of artistic approaches, and captures the artists’ personal takes on the theme of “memory”. — the artblog editors] As a young print enthusiast, it is always my pleasure to stumble across a show dedicated to the medium. Renderings: New Narratives and Reinterpretations, on view in the Mechanical Hall Gallery at the University of Delaware, is a perfect example of an exhibition that highlights works from a recognized collection and brings to light new scholarship in the printmaking field. Repeat, rework, reprint Drawn from the Philadelphia-based Brandywine Workshop, Renderings ... More » »

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