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Artwork

The New Yorker’s Passport 2014

[Evan offers a crisp review of a wide-ranging art crawl, highlighting favorites and weak spots, and commenting on the crawl’s effectively loose organization. — the artblog editors] One week after hardy and well-trained participants braved the pavement to complete the famous New York City Marathon, I completed a hefty trek of my own–The New Yorker’s Passport 2014 arts and culinary crawl through the Lower East Side and SoHo. A fully immersive day of gallery-hopping and tasty sampling, Passport left me with eyes and mind as worn as my legs and feet–the proximity of spaces was deceiving on paper, but I ... More » »

Paik in presentation of 'Good Morning Mr. Orwell' at the Kitchen Gallery, NY, Dec. 8,1983, photo © Lorenzo Bianda

Nam June Paik: Becoming Robot at the Asia Society, New York

[Andrea appreciates an intimate retrospective of Nam June Paik’s forward-thinking work, in which the artist’s foresight and sense of humor are easily apparent. — the artblog editors] Go, go, GO to the Asia Society before Jan. 4, 2015 to see Nam June Paik: Becoming Robot–even if you’ve seen lots of the artist’s work before. And if you’ve only seen the work in photographs, you’ve seen nothing. I thought I had a good understanding of Paik’s output; I’d been to the big Guggenheim retrospective in 2000, had read much published material, and briefly worked with the artist in connection with a ... More » »

Man in powdered wig

Exchange Rates — The Bushwick Expo

[Elizabeth experiences Bushwick, Brooklyn’s recent art fair, highlighting works that stayed with her; she notes that a relaxed atmosphere is among the fair’s admirable accomplishments. — the artblog editors] I can’t stop repeating “Something for the weekend, sir?” and comparing Exchange Rates: The Bushwick Expo to a barbershop, since the free art exposition recalls a chummy, neighborhood business that encourages serious networking amidst fleeting, down-to-earth pleasures. Months in the making, the international art exposition, which took place from Oct. 23-26, was fruit of the collaboration between Centotto and Theodore:Art galleries from Brooklyn, and the London-based Sluice___ Art initiative. Over 30 international ... More » »

Postcard

Sari Dienes — at the center of things, yet overlooked

[Andrea argues for the recognition and appreciation of Sari Dienes, a prolific and flexible artist whose work has largely been overlooked by history until this, her first solo museum show. — the artblog editors] The Drawing Center is showing a very small but powerful exhibition of the work of Sari Dienes (1898-1992), on view at the Lab gallery through Nov. 16; it is her first solo museum exhibition, and it is certainly belated. It is a must-see for anyone who is interested in the New York scene of the 1950s-80s, but doesn’t recognize Dienes’ name. Friends in all the right places Dienes ... More » »

Painting

Studio Living — Sarah McEneaney at Tibor de Nagy

[Michael Lieberman offers a curious and thoughtful review of Sarah McEneaney’s paintings, which reveal the artist’s quiet, imaginative life. — the artblog editors] The centerpiece of Sarah McEneaney’s fifth exhibition at Tibor de Nagy, Studio Living, is titled “ACT with Me (AB),” in which we find Sarah napping on a couch at home surrounded by her vigilant dog and cats–Angel, Cole, and Trixie (thus, ACT). AB is for “after Balthus” because Sarah’s pose in the painting is based upon the Balthus painting “Sleeping Girl,” in which a beautiful young woman is portrayed peacefully sleeping on a bed with one of ... More » »

Laurie Anderson interview

Laurie Anderson in conversation and performance at The New Yorker Festival

[Evan gets the chance to see Laurie Anderson perform, talk about her work, and explain her creative process. — the artblog editors] Ever vibrant and always defying definition, artist and musician Laurie Anderson has graced our eyes and ears with challenging and still incredibly enjoyable creations since the 1960s. In person at this year’s New Yorker Festival and in conversation with the magazine’s music critic, Alex Ross, Anderson presented the audience not just with her anecdotes and views on the world that she inhabits and creates from, but a few musical works in performance as well. Setting her own precedent ... More » »

Audience

Ai Weiwei, almost live and in person at the New Yorker Festival

[Evan attended a pre-recorded “talk” at the New Yorker Festival between Evan Osnos and Ai Weiwei. The artist spoke on living in limbo between freedom and imprisonment, and his hopes for a freer China one day.  — the artblog editors] Chinese multimedia artist Ai Weiwei has made headlines around the world for his provocative and unyielding works since he burst onto the American art world’s radar after coming to New York City in 1981. The international man of intrigue and controversy has been deified by some and demonized by others; he has become a centerpiece for debate on the ever ... More » »

Stained Glass

Dark Matter — Judith Schaechter at Claire Oliver Gallery

[Mary reviews a Gothic-inspired collection of works addressing feminine experience, imprisonment, and divinity versus darkness. – the artblog editors] Anyone able to should get up to New York to see Judith Schaechter’s exhibition Dark Matter at Claire Oliver Gallery before it closes on Oct. 25. Schaechter fully commands her conceptual and technical skills in signature stained-glass lightbox pieces and her first sculptures in kiln-cast glass. These exquisitely carved, small-scale figures create a physical intimacy and psychological vulnerability that confound our expectations of glass as rigid and unyielding. The subtle, complex surfaces of “Rest Egg” and the tortured emotion in the ... More » »

Mary Cassatt painting

Degas/Cassatt, and Titian’s “Danae” at the National Gallery of Art — An artistic friendship and the ultimate erotic painting

[Andrea visits a recent show focusing on the close friendship and artistic interchange between Edgar Degas and Mary Cassatt, including some unexpected deviations from the work we’re all familiar with. Then, she stops off to view Titian’s “Danae”. — the artblog editors] Degas/Cassatt, which was on view at the National Gallery of Art through Oct. 5, was a triumph of an exhibition, tightly conceived around ideas and artworks exchanged by the two artists in the early years of their friendship. I must admit that I had no interest in the exhibition before I saw it, thinking I knew the work ... More » »

Bridge

5×5 — A second series of temporary, public art projects for Washington, D.C.

[Andrea critiques Washington, D.C.’s newest public artwork series by individual works and on a broader level; she makes the point that sited art should be aimed at neighborhood dwellers, not visitors or curators. — the artblog editors] This year’s program of temporary, public artworks in D.C., 5×5, reflects both a broad and ambitious approach to work sited, and in some places constructed, in public venues across all four quadrants of the district. It is the second series of temporary public artworks supported by the D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities (DCCAH). The purpose of public art In a day’s viewing, I managed to ... More » »

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