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Tag Archive "painting"

Frank Bramblett Endurance detail

Live Comments – Frank Bramblett’s No Intention at Woodmere

[In this Live Comments, we hear about Frank Bramblett and his retrospective at Woodmere Art Museum.] What engages Frank Bramblett is the inner life of a painting, often built upon secrets that only the artist knows. Frank, who has a deep inner dialog with his works, has shared his art secrets with few — until now.  In our 2012 podcast with Frank, he revealed that when he spoke about art — like at student critiques, to which Libby and I were witness when we co-taught with him at Tyler — he was channeling his imaginary friend, Graham.  All we know is that Graham/Frank is ... More » »

Artwork

Two books on Matisse and Picasso from the Museum of Modern Art

[Andrea praises two recent volumes detailing Matisse’s cut-out works, and 15 of Picasso’s early Cubist works, respectively, and enjoys the depth provided by the second book’s e-book format. — the artblog editors] Art historians working in museums, as opposed to those in academe, are always aware that the artworks they deal with are things–embodied, resulting from a series of decisions made by the artist, and subject to subsequent change. The literature on art, both academic and in museum catalogs, has not always acknowledged this physical reality, but fortunately it is becoming more common. Two recent publications from the Museum of ... More » »

man smiling at table

Live Comments – Curator Robert Cozzolino on Peter Blume at PAFA

(Peter Blume’s works, which are riveting in reproduction, will stop you in your tracks when you see them in the large and beautifully installed survey at Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. )  Accomplished technically (the artist would spend 3 years on one painting), colorful, complex and symbolic, Peter Blume’s works like “The Rock,” “The Eternal City” and “Tasso’s Oak” are edgy visual puzzles. Andrea told you about the works and the show, organized by PAFA Senior Curator and Curator of Modern Art, Robert Cozzolino. Below are two great audio clips of Cozzolino elucidating. In the first (approximately 7 minutes long) he talks about “The Eternal City,” ... More » »

James Baldwin

Represent showcases 200 years of African-American art at the PMA

[Andrea investigates a varied show of African-American work at the PMA, and hopes it indicates a continuation of the museum’s recent outreach efforts. — the artblog editors] In 2001, the Philadelphia Museum of Art ( PMA) established the African-American Collections Committee to assist in the development of the museum’s collections. A catalog of the PMA’s holdings of work by African-Americans was a major goal of the committee, and has been in the works for the past decade. To celebrate its publication, the museum has organized the exhibition of 75 works by more than 50 artists, calling the show Represent: 200 Years of African ... More » »

Painting

V.S. Gaitonde at the Guggenheim Museum, N.Y.

[Andrea explores the subtleties of V.S. Gaitonde, a non-objective artist whose work shows the influence of Indian culture, Paul Klee, and Buddhism. — the artblog editors]  The extraordinarily seductive, abstract paintings of V.S. Gaitonde are unlikely to be familiar to Guggenheim Museum visitors, unless they have a prior knowledge of modern art in India. This makes a visit to V.S. Gaitonde: Painting as Process, Painting as Life (on view through Feb. 11, 2015) imperative for anyone wishing to engage with modern, non-Western art of the 1960s–1990s. Beyond that, it offers an intensely rich vision of the possibilities of painting. The exhibition ... More » »

Peter Blume "The Rock"  1945-48, o/c Art \institute of  Chicago.

Peter Blume at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

[Andrea lauds representational painter Peter Blume, whose finesse and imagination far outweigh his fame. — the artblog editors] Peter Blume: Nature and Metamorphosis, a large and well-conceived survey of the artist’s career, is at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA) through April 5. If the artist’s name is familiar, it’s likely you’ve spent time at the Art Institute of Chicago (AIC), where you’ve seen “The Rock” (1945-48). It is the only work of Blume’s I’ve seen on any museum wall until now, and it’s a showstopper. A group of figures are rebuilding within a post-apocalyptic landscape, dominated by a huge, ... More » »

Mary Cassatt painting

Degas/Cassatt, and Titian’s “Danae” at the National Gallery of Art — An artistic friendship and the ultimate erotic painting

[Andrea visits a recent show focusing on the close friendship and artistic interchange between Edgar Degas and Mary Cassatt, including some unexpected deviations from the work we’re all familiar with. Then, she stops off to view Titian’s “Danae”. — the artblog editors] Degas/Cassatt, which was on view at the National Gallery of Art through Oct. 5, was a triumph of an exhibition, tightly conceived around ideas and artworks exchanged by the two artists in the early years of their friendship. I must admit that I had no interest in the exhibition before I saw it, thinking I knew the work ... More » »

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The World Is an Apple — The Still Lifes of Paul Cézanne at the Barnes Foundation

[Jennifer digs into Cézanne’s labor-intensive approach to art-making, and dedication to certain still life subjects–both of which set the artist apart in his rapidly industrializing era. — the artblog editors] In his essay titled “Cézanne’s Doubt,” Maurice Merleau-Ponty tells us that it took Paul Cézanne “one hundred working sessions” to complete a still life. Last Tuesday, under a high-powered microscope in the Barnes Foundation’s light-filled conservation lab, it seemed that all the layers of paint applied in those 100 sessions were revealed. The microscope’s lens was focused on a small painting titled “Three Apples,” 1878-1879, temporarily removed from its usual location ... More » »

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Patterns & Permutations — Justin Kingsley Bean at JAG Modern

[Patterns possess the ability to both comfort and refresh the eye. Joshua reviews a colorful show that blends patterns comfortably into their gallery space. — the artblog editors] The alliterative title of Justin Kingsley Bean’s solo show at JAG Modern is an apt description of Bean’s artistic oeuvre. Patterns & Permutations–arrangements of color and geometric shapes–dominate the artist’s paintings. The mathematic exactness of Bean’s style is oddly soothing, despite the accosting power of the color that is everywhere in the small gallery. Bean has an evident interest in the forms, rhythms, and patterns of the everyday world that inspire his ... More » »

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Joe Fleming’s Suckerpunch at Mike Weiss Gallery

[Evan reviews an off-the-wall show that strays a bit too far in pursuit of perfection, and concludes that the paintings’ real success lie in their minor details. — the artblog editors] Suckerpunch is Toronto artist Joe Fleming’s first solo New York exhibition, taking place at Mike Weiss Gallery in Chelsea. Here, Fleming displays a series of paintings with a strong sculptural bent, using recycled materials, graphic geometric shapes, and gestural line and brush work. He’s clearly influenced by Pop Art and cultural iconography, and his geometrical forms are evocative and self-referential. Works fuse with the wall Fleming’s paintings are extremely textured. ... More » »

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