Tag Archive "sculpture"

Installation view

Destroy, she said — a group show at the Boiler in New York

[Andrea enjoys a few chuckles at a show that asks viewers to re-examine the value of objects and material experiences, and also asks artists to obliterate their work after showing it only once. — the artblog editors] Saul Anton and Ethan Spigland curated the provocative, lively, and thoughtful exhibition Destroy, she said, on view at the Boiler, in Brooklyn, March 5 – April 5, 2015, on behalf of Pierogi . It coincided with the establishment of an online archive, the “Foundation for Destroyed Art,” where according to the announcement, “works of art will exist only in their documented destruction and ... More » »

Artwork

Two books on Matisse and Picasso from the Museum of Modern Art

[Andrea praises two recent volumes detailing Matisse’s cut-out works, and 15 of Picasso’s early Cubist works, respectively, and enjoys the depth provided by the second book’s e-book format. — the artblog editors] Art historians working in museums, as opposed to those in academe, are always aware that the artworks they deal with are things–embodied, resulting from a series of decisions made by the artist, and subject to subsequent change. The literature on art, both academic and in museum catalogs, has not always acknowledged this physical reality, but fortunately it is becoming more common. Two recent publications from the Museum of ... More » »

The artist, surrounded by one of her sculptures, photo: L. Falquet, Paris: Anderson.

Books on Claire Falkenstein and Marie Zimmermann, successful women who should be better known

[Andrea reviews beautifully designed books on two female artists whose work, while successful during their lives, has largely been overlooked since. — the artblog editors] Claire Falkenstein Claire Falkenstein (The Falkenstein Foundation, Los Angeles: 2012), ISBN 978-1-4675-0834-6 This volume is a welcome survey of a successful, mid-20th-century artist, primarily known as a sculptor, whose work and reputation have inexplicably faded from view. She has disappeared from the record even more thoroughly than other artists working in the ’40s through ’60s who created cast and welded sculpture. That generation, deeply marked by the experience of war, was the last in a ... More » »

James Baldwin

Represent showcases 200 years of African-American art at the PMA

[Andrea investigates a varied show of African-American work at the PMA, and hopes it indicates a continuation of the museum’s recent outreach efforts. — the artblog editors] In 2001, the Philadelphia Museum of Art ( PMA) established the African-American Collections Committee to assist in the development of the museum’s collections. A catalog of the PMA’s holdings of work by African-Americans was a major goal of the committee, and has been in the works for the past decade. To celebrate its publication, the museum has organized the exhibition of 75 works by more than 50 artists, calling the show Represent: 200 Years of African ... More » »

Costumes

Books for holiday giving, part II

[Andrea continues her gift recommendations for art lovers. — the artblog editors] Inside Nick Cave’s “Soundsuits” Nick Cave: Epitome (Prestel: Munich, London, New York), ISBN 978-3791349169, $65 Nick Cave’s performative sculptures, which he calls “Soundsuits,” disguise their wearers and transform them into extravagant creatures of the artist’s imagination. The fact that many of them maintain evidence of the homey materials that Cave employs–including twigs, baskets, crocheted potholders, woven straw handbags, stuffed toys, and small ceramic figurines, as well as pipe cleaners, buttons, sequins, and beads–only makes his creations more magical, emphasizing Cave’s ability to discern the extravagant and theatrical potential of ... More » »

Art Basel Miami

Miami Project, on the periphery of Art Basel Miami

[Andrea singles out several favorites from Miami Project, one of ABMB’s satellite fairs. She found herself particularly drawn to drawings this year. — the artblog editors] Miami Project is a fairly new member of the 22 smaller fairs that circle, like small fish, around the shark that is Art Basel Miami Beach. The dealers are all well-established galleries across the U.S. As usual, I paid attention to the work that was unfamiliar, and found a lot of it interesting. Rare sketches from Mel Chin Mel Chin’s work was on view at Jonathan Ferrara Gallery (New Orleans): a wall piece in ... More » »

steelroots

Steve Tobin at the James A. Michener Museum

[Elizabeth grapples with a comprehensive exhibit of Steve Tobin’s works that collects pieces from several of the artist’s large-scale sculptural series. — the artblog editors] In the midst of July’s humidity, thunderstorms, and nerve-shattering fireworks, I visit the James A. Michener Museum in Doylestown, PA for Out of This World: Works by Steve Tobin. This selection of Tobin’s work to date includes samples from his Steelroots, Exploded Clay, Paintings, Sumi Ink Drawing, Doors, Lantern House, Syntax, and Earth Bronzes series. Large-scale construction; controlled destruction   Tobin is best known for Trinity Root, a memorial to the 9/11 attacks–a bronze cast of the ... More » »

rsz_syd_carpenter_more_places_of_our_own_installation_view

Syd Carpenter’s More Places of Our Own at the African American Museum in Philadelphia

[Jennifer visits an exhibition of evocative sculptural work by artist and Swarthmore professor Syd Carpenter, whose inspiration came from traveling to African American-owned farms and gardens in the South. — the artblog editors] Syd Carpenter’s ceramic and steel sculptures describe literal and ideological aspects of historic, black-owned farms and gardens in the American south. Carpenter’s works, both freestanding and high-relief, are now on view in an exhibition entitled More Places of Our Own at the African American Museum in Philadelphia through August 17.  The installation also includes a video of the people and places Carpenter visited during a driving tour of ... More » »

John Chamberlain, Tongue Pictures (1979)

Marfa, Texas and Environs

[Andrea hits the road to visit Donald Judd’s Marfa, Texas art installations, and lauds the way the unconventional site highlights the featured artworks. — the artblog editors] To those of us in the art world, “Marfa” means Donald Judd’s installations at the Chinati Foundation‎. The site opened to the public in 1986 and I’ve wanted to go since then, but Marfa is three and a half hours’ drive from the airport in El Paso, and even further from San Antonio, and I don’t like highway driving on my own. My good friend Hilary Jay, director of the Philadelphia Center for Architecture, ... More » »

Print

Sponsored post — The book of Chen — Reading between the lines of Long-bin Chen’s sculptures of musical composers

[In this post sponsored by the West Collection, Christian Viveros-Fauné explains how sculptor Long-bin Chen gives new life to a sometimes-devalued medium: books. — the artblog editors] “You cannot open a book without learning something.” ― Confucius The late Susan Sontag had it right: “A good book is an education of the heart.” Not only do books enlarge one’s “sense of human possibility,” she wrote, they also expand the individual’s “experience of the world.” Conversely—the great American cultural critic declared—books are “creators of inwardness.” It doesn’t take a huge imaginative leap to believe that, had she been asked, Sontag would have ... More » »

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