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artblog goes to florida, california and new york too.

Audience

Ai Weiwei, almost live and in person at the New Yorker Festival

[Evan attended a pre-recorded “talk” at the New Yorker Festival between Evan Osnos and Ai Weiwei. The artist spoke on living in limbo between freedom and imprisonment, and his hopes for a freer China one day.  — the artblog editors] Chinese multimedia artist Ai Weiwei has made headlines around the world for his provocative and unyielding works since he burst onto the American art world’s radar after coming to New York City in 1981. The international man of intrigue and controversy has been deified by some and demonized by others; he has become a centerpiece for debate on the ever ... More » »

Stained Glass

Dark Matter — Judith Schaechter at Claire Oliver Gallery

[Mary reviews a Gothic-inspired collection of works addressing feminine experience, imprisonment, and divinity versus darkness. – the artblog editors] Anyone able to should get up to New York to see Judith Schaechter’s exhibition Dark Matter at Claire Oliver Gallery before it closes on Oct. 25. Schaechter fully commands her conceptual and technical skills in signature stained-glass lightbox pieces and her first sculptures in kiln-cast glass. These exquisitely carved, small-scale figures create a physical intimacy and psychological vulnerability that confound our expectations of glass as rigid and unyielding. The subtle, complex surfaces of “Rest Egg” and the tortured emotion in the ... More » »

Mary Cassatt painting

Degas/Cassatt, and Titian’s “Danae” at the National Gallery of Art — An artistic friendship and the ultimate erotic painting

[Andrea visits a recent show focusing on the close friendship and artistic interchange between Edgar Degas and Mary Cassatt, including some unexpected deviations from the work we’re all familiar with. Then, she stops off to view Titian’s “Danae”. — the artblog editors] Degas/Cassatt, which was on view at the National Gallery of Art through Oct. 5, was a triumph of an exhibition, tightly conceived around ideas and artworks exchanged by the two artists in the early years of their friendship. I must admit that I had no interest in the exhibition before I saw it, thinking I knew the work ... More » »

Bridge

5×5 — A second series of temporary, public art projects for Washington, D.C.

[Andrea critiques Washington, D.C.’s newest public artwork series by individual works and on a broader level; she makes the point that sited art should be aimed at neighborhood dwellers, not visitors or curators. — the artblog editors] This year’s program of temporary, public artworks in D.C., 5×5, reflects both a broad and ambitious approach to work sited, and in some places constructed, in public venues across all four quadrants of the district. It is the second series of temporary public artworks supported by the D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities (DCCAH). The purpose of public art In a day’s viewing, I managed to ... More » »

Kevin Beasley, "Untitled, 2014," Polyurethane foam, resin, shorts, t-shirt, underwear, cotton rag and zip ties, 10 x 15 x 13 inches. Photo by Adam Reich, courtesy of The Studio Museum in Harlem.

Material Histories presents its artists in residence at The Studio Museum in Harlem

[Rachel visits an exhibition featuring the work of three artists whose Harlem neighborhoods inform their work. — the artblog editors] A residency for any artist is a time to reflect. Invited into a new space, setting, and sense of pace, the artist is given the opportunity to foster his/her artistic process, while actively exploring a new community. Since 1968, the Artist-in-Residence program at The Studio Museum in Harlem has been enabling visual artists of African and Latino descent to do just that–explore themselves, and explore Harlem. Neighborhood influence Material Histories, on view at The Studio Museum through October 26, 2014, features ... More » »

James Lee Byars Untitled (‘Performable Scroll’) c. 1967, courtesy Michael Werner Gallery

Performing the dead and other questions around museums and authenticity

[Andrea considers the evolution of art’s “authenticity”; museums’ fetishistic need to present original works; and the practice of replicating pieces as “exhibition copies”. — the artblog editors] I received notice from MoMA that on August 17 and September 7, the museum is hosting performances by James Lee Byars, in connection with the retrospective of his work at P.S. 1. Since the artist is long-dead, what exactly is the museum presenting? Byars did many performance pieces–indeed, his life sounds like an extended performance. Some of Byars’ performances involved another person interacting with an object of the artist’s making, and Byars donated ... More » »

Lygia Clark wearing Máscara abismo com tapa-olhos (Abyssal mask with eye-patch, 1968), a work made of fabric, elastic bands, a nylon bag, and a stone, in use. Courtesy Associação Cultural “O Mundo de Lygia Clark,” Rio de Janeiro. Photograph Credit: Sergio Gerardo Zalis, 1986.

Lygia Clark: The Abandonment of Art, 1948–1988 at MoMA

[Natalia offers a wonderfully in-depth exploration of MoMA’s Lygia Clark retrospective, spanning from the artist’s first paintings to her later interactive installations. — the artblog editors] Currently on view at the Museum of Modern Art, Lygia Clark: The Abandonment of Art, 1948–1988 is the first comprehensive retrospective in North America devoted to the artistic practice of the Brazilian-born, experimental artist known for her participatory works that engage the interaction of the spectator. Divided into three distinct sections, the exhibition explores the entirety of Clark’s massive oeuvre, including her paintings, sculptures, participatory works, and installation pieces. Leaving the confines of canvas ... More » »

muralweb3

David Novros mural at Donald Judd’s Spring Street home and studio; the ups and downs of permanently-sited works

[Andrea visits David Novros’ recently restored site-specific work, and discusses the pros and cons of creating art destined for one space. — the artblog editors] In mid-June, I joined a small group to celebrate the recent restoration of David Novros’ untitled mural (1970) at Donald Judd’s Spring Street home and studio, which is under the auspices of the Judd Foundation. It was one of two works–the other a large, light work by Dan Flavin–that Judd commissioned for the five-story, cast-iron industrial building at 101 Spring St., which he purchased in 1968. Judd and Novros both felt strongly that the siting ... More » »

lechaman

Inorganic chemistry — sexual synthesis at M+B Gallery

[Nate visits a show juxtaposing the at-the-time groundbreaking work of Pierre Molinier with new drawings by contemporary artist Aurel Schmidt. — the artblog editors] In major American cities such as Los Angeles and New York, assertions of sexual identity are no longer the risky phenomena they once were. President Obama’s recent announcement of June as LGBTQIA Pride Month–a gesture of support on behalf of the federal government–attests to the changing climate of a country that has for so long ignored the very real, very serious lives of its queer citizens. This change must be taken into account when examining the ... More » »

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Joe Fleming’s Suckerpunch at Mike Weiss Gallery

[Evan reviews an off-the-wall show that strays a bit too far in pursuit of perfection, and concludes that the paintings’ real success lie in their minor details. — the artblog editors] Suckerpunch is Toronto artist Joe Fleming’s first solo New York exhibition, taking place at Mike Weiss Gallery in Chelsea. Here, Fleming displays a series of paintings with a strong sculptural bent, using recycled materials, graphic geometric shapes, and gestural line and brush work. He’s clearly influenced by Pop Art and cultural iconography, and his geometrical forms are evocative and self-referential. Works fuse with the wall Fleming’s paintings are extremely textured. ... More » »

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