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Tag Archive "african-american-artists"

Maren Hassenger performing Senga Nengudi’s "RSVP" at the Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston, Nov. 17, 2012

Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art

[Andrea comments on a large exhibition of contemporary performance art by African-American artists, finding both the show's performances and accompanying catalog well-curated and memorable. For more information on individual artists, please see Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art, Valerie Cassel Oliver, ed. (Contemporary Art Museum, Houston; 2013), ISBN 978 -1-933619-38-5 --the artblog editors] In New York, the exhibition Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art was split between the Grey Art Gallery at NYU (from Sept. 10 – Dec. 7, 2013) and the Studio Museum in Harlem, where it remains on view until March 9, 2014. It does a particularly good ... More » »

Alina Szapocznikow two Sculpture-Lamps c. 1966-70 polyester resin and electrical wiring

Catalog Reviews – Alina Szapocznikow, Made in L.A., Now Dig This!

Elena Filipovic, Joanna Mytkowska, et al. Alina Szapocznikow; Sculpture undone (Museum of Modern Art, New York and Mercatorfonds, Brussels: 2011) ISBN 978-0-87070-824-4 This catalog accompanies the first substantial exhibition of the Polish sculptor,  Alina Szapocznikow (1926-1973) to be seen outside Poland, and is a thorough and considered introduction to her work. The exhibition was organized jointly by WEILS Contemporary Art Centre, Brussels, and the Museum of Modern Art, NY (MOMA), where it is currently on view. I saw the exhibition in Los Angeles this winter. It is a stunner, and a reminder that the dominant theme in the history of ... More » »

Faith Ringgold ‘We Came to America’ (1997), painted story quilt, acrylic on canvas with fabric border; 74 1/2 x 79 1/2 in, PAFA

After Tanner: African American Artists since 1948 at PAFA

As recent national news has made painfully clear, ours is not  a post-racial society, and much as I’d rather not see African American artists exhibited in the context of their common racial background, such exhibitions still have a place. That place is particularly important in Philadelphia, where the extent of art world segregation still surprises me; among the mainstream (read white) institutions, the Fabric Workshop Museum  and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts (PAFA) have a strong history of supporting artists of color; unfortunately the color line extends to many of the galleries and their audiences, as well. After Tanner; ... More » »