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Tag Archive "ena-swansea"

Manifesto. From left to right: Olympia Scarry, Antoine Guerrero, Lola Montes Schnabel, Elisabeth von Thurn und Taxis, Ena Swansea, Ellen Berkenblit. © Sasha Arutyunova.

News post – In memory of Clinton Swingle, flora + fauna at 161 West, Ena Swansea at the French Alliance, opportunities and more!

News Clinton Darlington Swingle, the developer of the historic Fabric Workshop and Museum at 1214 Arch Street, passed away on January 27. He was responsible for modernizing and completely renovating the Museum into the modern galleries and studio spaces there today; additionally, he was involved with many of the Museum’s Artist-in-Residence installations. As a tribute to Swingle, on February 2 the Brooklyn-based, modern percussion ensemble So- Percussion performed their last piece, Clapping Music by Steve Reich at FWM. In lieu of flowers and notes, individuals may make a donation to The Fabric Workshop and Museum in memory of Clint Swingle to fund the building operations. Phil ... More » »

Photos: Suikang Zhao, selected images from Taokonick, 2012

News post – Preservation push, Aqua Dice’s NYTimes nod, NextFab’s grand opening, opportunities and more!

News Above: the magic that happens when Photoshop wizardry and Philadelphia’s most iconic statue find one another. For their New Year’s greeting, the PMA’s Department of Indian and Himalayan Art created this gem, featuring Rocky in his typical composure, but joined by a surprising companion: the Hindu deity Krishna, who in this iteration is “Krishna Dances and Holds Aloft Two Stolen Balls of Butter,” The copper alloy sculpture was made in Orissa, India in the 17th century, 1994-148-262. This comes to us from the Stella Kramrisch Collection at the Department of Indian and Himalayan Art. 2 in preservation news – 1. Created by Philadelphia’s own Conservation ... More » »

Light fare at the fairs-Part 1

Maybe we went on less crowded days this year but the four fairs Libby and I saw Thursday and Friday (Pulse, Armory, Scope and Volta) were less populated with lookers than when we went to the fairs last year. But because a fair has nowhere to go but up, the numbers of exhibitors was greater than ever (as was the number of fairs–I believe there were 13 this year). We swam through masses of booths with thousands and thousands of pieces of art and found lots interesting things, and some that made us cheer (singly or in unison). Libby will ... More » »