Glass, paper, time and space at Temple Gallery

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Robert Geyer
Robert Geyer, recycled glass mountain, from his Tyler MFA show last week.

In between the Tyler groundbreaking ceremony last Friday at 11 and a meeting at 2 pm with Pepon Osorio at the Lighthouse to see his Badge of Honor installation (highly recommended! — see my flickr set, and watch for a post soon) I ran into Old City and stopped in to Temple Gallery to see the MFA shows. I had gotten a heads’ up on one of them, from Corey Antis, a Vox Populi member who wrote us about his show. We’ve covered his Vox shows on artblog. The other MFA show artist — who was in the gallery when I stopped by — is Robert Geyer, a glass artist who also runs the gallery the Barbershop out of his house.

Robert Geyer
Geyer, standing with his work, around 6 hours before the show’s opening, when I stopped in.

Geyer was fixing a broken piece in his show and working hard to get it done before the opening reception at 6 pm. Geyer’s show involved found glass, specifically the faceted glass covers from fluorescent light fixtures, and he told me that someone had backed into a big circular wall piece (by accident) and the glass cracked. Geyer’s a glass major so he went and cut another big circle of glass and was getting ready to replace the broken piece. The glass is attached to some kind of motor that causes it to spin. Sounds great but I couldn’t wait to see the finished work so we will all have to imagine it.

Meanwhile, the freestanding glass sculpture that looks like a crystal mountain had great appeal. Geyer said that while normal glass reflects light, the faceted glass absorbs it and the object seems to contain light. He said the piece looked great at night. I thought it looked pretty great during the day.

Corey Antis, from his show, the Parallax View
Corey Antis, from his show, the Parallax View

In the back room, Antis’s show, the Parallax View was a series of large works on paper (paintings I believe) that were architectural and while some felt a little like architectural renderings some defied ideas of real space and seemed to be false spaces, things that would not be walked into under any circumstances.

Corey Antis
Corey Antis

I note here that this is the second show I’ve seen with a title referring to a 1970s movie thriller. The Parallax View (1974) is a conspiracy movie with political overtones. It’s about a political assissination and the opening scene has been done up to resemble the assassination of Robert Kennedy in 1968. The other paranoid-conspiracy-movie exhibit was, of course, Logan’s Run, curated by Damian Weinkrantz, based on the movie Logan’s Run, 1976, which tells of a society where those older than age 30 are killed.

More photos at flickr.

Tags

corey antis, robert geyer, tyler mfa show

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