Lecture today by Amy Sherald, visiting artist at Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Dindga McCannon’s Revolutionary Sister and a good Mural Arts Program opportunity for fiber artists
We are excited for today's lecture at PAFA by portrait painter, Amy Sherald, whose recently completed portrait of former First Lady Michelle Obama was unveiled with much fanfare and acclaim at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C. We are planning our trip, but until then we'll see you at PAFA to hear the artist speak about her work. Also, news about Philadelphia's Dindga McCannon's and her fabulous "Revolutionary Sister." Plus a good opportunity with Mural Arts.

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NEWS

Portrait of former First Lady, Michelle Obama, by Amy Sherald. From the National Portrait Gallery
Michelle LaVaughn Robinson Obama, born 1964, Chicago, Illinois, by Amy Sherald

​By now we’ve all seen pictures of the stunning portrait of former First Lady Michelle Obama painted by artist Amy Sherald. (See the actual portrait at the National Portrait Gallery, first floor) Well, today, Friday, March 2, 2018, the artist will be at PAFA giving a talk. We are excited to hear more about this artist’s monochrome portraits, and hope to see you there. ​For full lineup of visiting artist speakers, see the PAFA website. We note that on March 28, Deborah Roberts, who Michael Lieberman told you about, will be speaking in this series. Put it on your calendar!

PAFA ​Visiting Artists Program: Amy Sherald
T O D A Y Friday, March 2 | 12:00-1:00pm

Amy Sherald is a figurative painter, whose portraits offer a critical view of African American cultural history and representations of their bodies. Sherald was recently commissioned to paint former First Lady Michelle Obama’s official portrait for the National Portrait Gallery. PAFA’s student-run series of lectures takes place in their Historic Landmark Building.

This student-run program brings an outstanding roster of local, national and international artists to PAFA each semester for lectures, critiques, and workshops. The program exposes students and the public to a range of artistic approaches, and fosters discussion about contemporary art and ideas. All lectures are free and take place in PAFA’s Historic Landmark Building, 12 – 1 p.m.

Amy Sherald is a figurative painter, whose portraits offer a critical view of African American cultural history and representations of their bodies. She is known for using a grayscale to paint skin tones as a way of challenging the concept of color-as-race. Sherald was recently commissioned to paint former First Lady Michelle Obama’s official portrait for the National Portrait Gallery.


Dindga McCannon (American, born 1947). Revolutionary Sister, 1971. Mixed media construction on wood, 62x27” Brooklyn Museum. Gift of R.M. Atwater, Anna Wolfrom Dove, Alice Fiebiger, Joseph Fiebiger, Belle Campbell Harriss, and Emma L. Hyde, by exchange, Designated Purchase Fund, Mary Smith Forward Fund, Dick S. Ramsay Fund, and Carll H. De Silver Fund, 2012.80.32 copyright Dindga McCannon. (Photo: Jonathan Dorado, Brooklyn Museum)
Dindga McCannon (American, born 1947). Revolutionary Sister, 1971. Mixed media construction on wood, 62×27” Brooklyn Museum. Gift of R.M. Atwater, Anna Wolfrom Dove, Alice Fiebiger, Joseph Fiebiger, Belle Campbell Harriss, and Emma L. Hyde, by exchange, Designated Purchase Fund, Mary Smith Forward Fund, Dick S. Ramsay Fund, and Carll H. De Silver Fund, 2012.80.32 copyright Dindga McCannon. (Photo: Jonathan Dorado, Brooklyn Museum)

Artist and Artblog friend, Betty Leacraft writes with this news…”2017 was a banner year for my friend, Dindga McCannon, as a featured artist in the amazing traveling exhibition We Wanted A Revolution (Brooklyn Museum of Art) and she continues in 2018 with her current solo exhibition in Springfield, MA. (Feb 1-28) at Amy H. Carberry Fine Arts Gallery.”

Congratulations, Dindga! Here’s a write up about “Revolutionary Sister,” from the show’s page at the Brooklyn Museum website.

Dindga McCannon wrote about her inspiration for making Revolutionary Sister:

In the 60’s and 70’s we didn’t have many women warriors (that we were aware of) so I created my own. Her headpiece is made from recycled mini flag poles. The shape was inspired by my thoughts on the statue of liberty; she represents freedom for so many but what about us (African Americans)? My warrior is made from pieces from the hardware store—another place women were not welcomed back then. My thoughts were my warrior is hard as nails. I used a lot of the liberation colors: red—for the blood we shed; green—for the Motherland—Africa; and black—for the people. The bullet belt validates her warrior status. She doesn’t need a gun; the power of change exists within her. The belt was mine. In the early 70’s bullet belts were a fashion statement, I think inspired by the blaxploitation movies of the time. I couldn’t afford the metal belts, probably purchased at army navy surplus stores, so I made do with a plastic one.


OPPORTUNITY

Call for Artists: Mural Arts Philadelphia Artist Residencies – Fiber Art – DEADLINE MARCH 15, 2018

Deadline March 15: Mural Arts Philadelphia invites fiber artists to apply for the Tacony LAB Community Arts Center 2018 Spring/Summer Artist Residency. This 12-week residency, housed in a storefront arts hub on the Torresdale Avenue Commercial Corridor in Lower Northeast Philadelphia, is a unique opportunity to combine personal practice, community engagement, and the creation of civically-focused public art.

The resident artist will work with this historic and diverse neighborhood to develop a fiber-based project that brings community members together through collaborative creation, building relationships and encouraging neighborhood pride. The project must have a public visual component outside of the four walls of the LAB.

The artist selected for the residency will have access to the LAB studio space for both personal practice and project creation; the space will be shared with LAB art classes and workshops. The artist will receive a total stipend of $4,000, in addition to full funding for materials and supplies associated with project creation. The artist will be expected to spend approximately 15 hours per week on-site in the studio and the Tacony neighborhood. A portion of this time will be devoted to engaging the community through workshops with youth and adults, LAB open houses, relevant community meetings, and similar events.

Visit the Mural Arts Program website for more information and to download the application.

Tags

Amy Sherald, Dindga McCannon, Michelle Obama portrait, Revolutionary Sister

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