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Tag Archive "mia-rosenthal"

Anchorage Art Museum, where Diedra Krieger is now. Photo courtesy of the AAR.

News post – ICA counts down to 50, Mia Rosenthal in Little Rock, “Rescue or Destroy” saves/scourges, opportunities and more!

News ICA@50 is wrapping up its anniversary celebration on August 17 with a reverse countdown, a reflection, and a musical celebration. A film by Korean artist Jeamin Cha, the Group ZERO exhibition, and a serenade by Bardo Pond and DJ LIGHTHEAT all come together for the closing celebration on ICA’s terrace. Lil’ Pop Shop popsicles, a variety of snacks, and beer are amongst the edible offerings. The Pew Foundation’s Friday web feature is a weekly spotlight on what’s going on in the lives of their Fellows. On deck this week is 2012 Pew Fellow Dan Murphy, who runs Megawords with Anthony Smyrski. If you want ... More » »

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Interview with the artist — Mia Rosenthal’s plans for her Leonore Annenberg Fellowship

[Rachel sits down with artist Mia Rosenthal, who recently wrapped her second solo show and has big plans for her just-awarded career development grant. — the artblog editors] What would I do if I could do anything? What is it that I really want to do? That is what Mia Rosenthal has been asking herself since applying for a 2014 Leonore Annenberg Fellowship. As fellowship winners were announced this week, Rosenthal became one of seven recipients of a $50,000 career development grant awarded by the Leonore Annenberg Fellowship Funds. The award comes at the end of her second solo show, ... More » »

Mia Rosenthal, "MacBook Pro (Scott)."

Mia Rosenthal takes it one day at a time at Gallery Joe

[Chip explains the subject of a series by artist Mia Rosenthal: the subtle connections between our lives on Earth and the bigger, cosmic picture. — the artblog editors] What on earth do space, pizza, MacBooks, and evolution have in common? Well, frankly, not an awful lot. Despite their apparently arbitrary assortment, Mia Rosenthal draws together all of these elements and populates Gallery Joe with them for her solo show A Little Bit Every Day, which is as conceptually unexpected as it is painstakingly crafted. By illustrating what we know directly from our daily lives (laptops, phones, and Google searches) and pairing that ... More » »

Marc Newson, Ford 021C Concept Car, 1999.  Check the snub nose and square lines - way ahead of its time!

February – Cold outside but hot inside, a belated First Friday photo post

First Friday started early for Libby and me with a trip to the Perelman Building at the PMA with Collab board president Vesna Todorovicz Sacks, who showed us the Collab 2013 Design Excellence Award show of Australian designer Marc Newson.  Not only is the work a delight — playful, colorful, sleek and clean, the design of the show itself is very cool.  Like an exploded 3D version of a model home, the show features a garage with a Ford Concept Car, a kitchen, living room, two bedrooms and bath–a highly engaging little pad to dream yourself into. The Australian designer, ... More » »

“After Kensett: Shrewsbury River, New Jersey” Ink and graphite on paper, 8 ¼ x 12 ½ in., 2012

Landscapes teeming with units of life – Mia Rosenthal’s hand-drawn, digital-era works at Gallery Joe

In lieu of brush strokes by the thousands, organisms by the thousands form the contours of the natural world in Mia Rosenthal’s American Landscapes, her first solo outing with Gallery Joe.  In the show, which consists primarily of reinterpreted 19th-century paintings from the Hudson River School, Rosenthal converts the pastoral landscapes into images built on whimsical line drawings of units of individual species of flora and fauna. Divided by phylum and kingdom into taxonomic constellations, the organisms are drawn alongside their colloquial names — southern flying squirrel, river otter, duckweed, red fox, southern bog, box turtle – and depicted in ... More » »

Mia Rosenthal Postpartum Portrait, 2010 Ink and graphite on paper Courtesy of the artist and Gallery Joe, Philadelphia © Mia Rosenthal

Narcissus in the studio at PAFA – embracing life, death and the figure

Bay area figure painter Joan Brown hugs a fish. Hans Weingaertner, a German-born transplant to the US, shows his naked reflection in the mirror on which he crouches–but keeps his fish out of sight. Narcissus in the Studio, an exhibit of portraits and self-portraits at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, is full of delights and surprises, fearlessly hung to show the many ways that portraits are about more than reproducing a face or even suggesting an identity, but that they can be about mortality; life with its woes and joys; and the mind. The exhibit of more than 100 works ... More » »

Mia Rosenthal "General Mills 8 Pack" Ink and gouache on mylar

The harmony networks – It’s Who You Know at Projects Gallery

Projects Gallery did something unique for their current exhibition. Instead of choosing 25 artists for a summer group show, they chose five and asked them to each pick five more. The show’s fate rested on networking.

Mia Rosenthal's mail art project at Tiger Strikes Asteroid

Eternity and memorials in Chinatown last Friday

I toured the Vox building quickly last First Friday roaming the floors, happy to see that even in June the energy was high with lots of interesting work everywhere. Oddly, there seemed to be memorials on every floor. Memorials to art, to art-makers, to…well in many cases it wasn’t clear what was being memorialized. But the boom in nostalgia is big and getting bigger. At this point, we could all benefit from some heat and rage to temper the flood of sadness in the air.

Gabriel Martinez, Untitled (Peking Ducks),"Pink" 2009, archival pigment print, 31 x 59 inches

What’s it Worth? Works on Paper at Arcadia–the show

This is part 2 of a 2 part post. Part 1 is about the talk delivered by show juror Joao Ribas. Ribas’ choices for the Arcadia Works on Paper exhibit raise issues of sharing, reproducibility and loss of copyright control. They raise disturbing questions about the value of all art at a time when works on paper have never been more highly valued.