Amy Lipton brings Schuylkill Center show to One Nickel Coworking in Manayunk, Nell Painter, historian turned artist, at the Free Library
We round up the news! There's a new space opening in Manayunk and Amy Lipton organizes a show from the Schuylkill Center, "Learn a River's Name" to debut the space. Also, historian Nell Painter speaks at the Free Library on her two-career life and her move from history professor at Princeton to artist.

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Art History by Nell Painter Volume XXVII: Ancestral Arts is the textbook the artist wished she had. It is a pre-history of contemporary art by African American artists, emphasizing historiography and institutions. From installation of "Sharp-Tongued Figuration" at Stedman Gallery, 2017
Art History by Nell Painter Volume XXVII: Ancestral Arts is the textbook the artist wished she had. It is a pre-history of contemporary art by African American artists, emphasizing historiography and institutions. From installation of “Sharp-Tongued Figuration” at Stedman Gallery, 2017

​Nell Painter, noted author of NY Times bestseller “The History of White People” (2010) and other works speaks at Free Library next Tuesday.  It’s free and don’t miss it! Painter’s new book, “Old in Art School: A Memoir of Starting Over” is as you imagine, a story about Painter’s career switch, from historian to artist! I was introduced to the work of the emeritus professor of American History at Princeton by Andrea Kirsh, our contributor and resident feminist, who organized a group show for Rutgers Camden’s Stedman Gallery, “Sharp-Tongued Figuration,” a great exhibition, in which Painter’s work appeared with that of Sue Coe, Mickalene Thomas, Sandy Winters and Kukuli Velarde.  Here’s the blurb I put into the News post about it last year.  Here’s more from the Free Library’s website:

Nell Irvin Painter | Old in Art School: A Memoir of Starting Over
Tue, May 22, 2018 7:30 p.m.
Parkway Central Library
1901 Vine Street (between 19th and 20th Streets on the Parkway)

Cost: FREE

Celebrated historian Nell Irvin Painter’s many books include Sojourner Truth, Creating Black Americans, and, most recently, The History of White People, a national bestseller examining the dangerous socially constructed notion of whiteness. The Edwards Professor of American History, Emerita, at Princeton University, Painter directed that institution’s Program in African American Studies from 1997 to 2000 and has served on a number of editorial boards and professional groups, including the Society of American Historians, the Association of Black Women Historians, and the American Antiquarian Society. Old in Art School is a memoir of Painter’s surprising decision to return to the academy as a student in her sixties to earn a BFA and MFA in painting.


"The Marcellus," by Ana Berta Hernandez, in "Learn a River's Name" The Delaware text in the photo is one of a few river name etymology texts that was hung throughout the gallery when the show was up at the Schuylkill Center.
“The Marcellus,” by Ana Berta Hernandez, in “Learn a River’s Name” The Delaware text in the photo is one of a few river name etymology texts that was hung throughout the gallery when the show was up at the Schuylkill Center.

Independent Curator and co-director of ecoartspace, Amy Lipton, brings “Learn a River’s Name” to Manayunk.   Originally curated and exhibited at the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education, “River’s Name” opens May 29 at One Nickel Coworking, a multi-use building on Main Street that Lipton and her sister Jane own and have rehabbed.   I am a long-time fan of Lipton, who has worked with hundreds of artists and is a writer, lecturer and facilitator of discussions about art and the environment.  Amy did a lot of terrific curating for Abington Art Center including the show Handmaking, in 2007, a great roundup of Indoor and outdoor works using non-standard (at the time!) raw materials like newspapers and materials from AC Moore craft supply house. Here’s my review. More information below about “Learn a River’s Name.”

Learn a River’s Name
Opening reception May 29th, 2018, 5–7pm,
One Nickel Coworking
4323 Main Street, Manayunk

Artists
Camp Little Hope (Walker Tufts and Aislinn Pentecost-Farren)
Matthew Friday
Ana Berta Hernandez
Sandy Sorlien
Mare Liberum with Chloe Wang

Learn a River’s Name was curated by Christina Catanese for the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education. The Manayunk exhibition is organized by Independent Curator Amy Lipton.

About the show…Thinking of bodies of water, a name is an opening, a prelude, a microcosm, a way to be known – a first step on the pathway to meaningful connections between people and nature. This exhibition is guided by this question: how can art help us to know a river’s name, to not only value it but know it, and therefore to seek to steward it? With a focus on water bodies in the Mid-Atlantic region, seven artists explore rivers and streams that are neighbors to the Schuylkill Center — the Schuylkill, Delaware, Brandywine, and Hudson Rivers.

About One Nickel Coworking at The Nickels Building

One Nickel Coworking includes office space of 6000 sq. feet of work space on 2 floors located in the heart of Manayunk on Main Street with an 80-foot wall and large storefront windows for curated gallery exhibitions, a café, conference rooms, desk space, media lounge, and lecture and performance areas. One Nickel’s Power of Art series will include an ongoing program of exhibitions, talks, panels and workshops in partnership and collaboration with local Manayunk and Roxborough community cultural organizations as well as with artists working and living in the Philadelphia

For further information on the exhibition and programming please contact: Amy Lipton liptonarts@gmail.com For further information on One Nickel Coworking please contact: Jim Bauer bauerjim7@gmail.com . Visit the One Nickel website for more.

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