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Hannah Price on photographing men on the streets in Philadelphia – a new podcast

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October 31, 2011   ·   7 Comments

Hannah Price

Hannah Price is the youngest artist included in the Philadelphia Museum of Art’s exhibit of local artists, Here and Now. Now 25, Price graduated in 2009 with a BFA in photography from Rochester Institute of Technology.  She’s had remarkable success for such a young artist.  In addition to the current museum show she’s in she won an award in the Philadelphia Photo Art Center’s first emerging artist exhibit, Next, and has exhibited her works in group shows at Gallery 339, the city’s premier commercial photography gallery.  Price’s color photos, shot in film and printed digitally, show street scenes and people on depopulated streets or alone inside large buildings. Her series City of Brotherly Love is a response to all the cat calls she receives from men in her trips around the city. They shout out to her and she turns and asks to take their photo. It’s not a come-on by her (although often the men think it is). She is documenting one part of her daily life. Hannah has lots of opinions and among other things we learned that she deleted her Facebook page a year ago and never looked back.

Hannah Price

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Right click to download full 10 min. interview with Hannah Price

This episode is edited by Peter Crimmins. The music is by Eric Biondo. The slide show is edited by artblog Intern Alison McMenamin. Thanks to the Knight Foundation for helping us get the ball rolling on this project. Thanks also to J-Lab‘s Enterprise Reporting Fund and William Penn Foundation for additional support and to our partner WHYY NewsWorks for their ongoing support and for sharing artblog radio episodes on the arts & culture page of their community news site NewsWorks.org. You can subscribe to artblog radio on iTunes.

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7 Responses to “Hannah Price on photographing men on the streets in Philadelphia – a new podcast”

  1. K says:

    “transitioning from suburban Colorado to consistently being harassed on the streets of Philadelphia.” Have to respect the work, but harassed is such a loaded word. Maybe intentionally so? It’s interesting.

  2. [...] * The ArtBlog, “Hannah Price on photographing men on the streets in Philadelphia – a new podcast“ [...]

  3. [...] activism happening in Philadelphia, PA, USA. 1) Hannah Price, a 25-year-old photographer, photographed some of her street harassers and they’re part of an exhibit at the Philadelphia Museum of Art through December 4; 2) Kara [...]

  4. [...] Hannah Price took photos of some of her street harassers and they were included in an exhibit at the Philadelphia Museum of [...]

  5. TKTK says:

    Not sure what you mean by ‘loaded’ K. Can you elaborate?

  6. Mike says:

    Yes completely loaded. So what is the difference between harassment and being a man and showing interest. If she was attracted to them it wouldn’t be harassment I’m sure. I get “harassed” by large women at work if we are going to throw it around

  7. P says:

    Mike, the difference is the art of being considerate of fellow human beings. Are you enjoying the attention you get from those women? There’s a hint of ‘no’, so just remember that hardly any woman enjoys the same type of attention from a strange (and possibly dangerous) man–large, small, or medium. Your momentary ‘interest’ really isn’t so important that you become exempt from all of social etiquette; here’s to hoping you’ve enough empathy to understand that.

    By the way, the ‘they do it too’ argument isn’t a magical justification for contemptible behavior. Don’t you have free will?

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